Messing with tradition

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This topic contains 49 replies, has 49 voices, and was last updated by  Christopher Ramesh 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • #13798

    Neil Martin
    Keymaster

    What are your thoughts on Martina Navratalova’s comments on tennis player wearing headphones just before the game. Are they getting psyched up or being disrespectful. For further information, these news articles may be of interst:

     

    #15115

    leopoldoferrer
    Participant

    She is not disrespectful, but I have a doubt regarding the word “Psyched up”. If Psyched up is only related to arousal level, the music is not used only for this purpose.
    The music can be used to modify the athlete´s emotional state. It is not only arousal. The athletes can use the music to regulate valence (regarding to positive or negative emotions), arousal and other emotional factors associated to optimal performance estate in the mind of the athlete. When the stress is triggered by any stimulus, they can use music to elevate (pick up) the arousal level, but they can use music to reduce it and relax. And sometimes the music is used to reduce a positive emotional response.
    If any high and positive emotional state is out of the optimal performance zone, the athlete should need to use a negative emotional music to return to the optimal performance zone.
    The music can improve motivation. So in the competition, the athletes have to have several selected music. They have to pay attention to their emotional and motivational state and decide what music to hear in what specific moment.
    Additionally, the music can be used to stop paying attention to stressful stimulus, to improve recovery after hard work and improve sleep in the night.
    In my opinion, there are three gaps in the knowledge on the use of music in sport psychology. First, if you look into the music therapy field, you find it is used to improve several psychological processes (like thinking, learning, memory, perception, etc) in patients who are not athletes. The athletes need to improve the same psychological processes to raise their sport performance. But the sport psychologists often use music only to regulate emotion, motivation and attention.
    The other gap is related to activities joined to music. In sport psychology we often use only passive listening. But music therapy (used to help non-athletes patients) has different kinds of technics. I am talking about active and passive technics of music therapy.
    The other gap is the lyrics of the songs. The experts on the use of music in sport psychology have published a lot of scientific articles. But they never talk about the lyrics of the songs and this is an important factor. For example, If you hear a music and the lyrics is saying “Punch, Punch Punch..” you will be aggressive because the lyrics. Some athletes need to be aggressive to win a competition.
    I think the sport psychology should pay attention to music therapy and apply the several music therapy technics in sport psychology.

    #15328

    Adam Szuster
    Participant

    As has been covered music is a personal thing. Some like it to rev themselves up, others use it to calm their nerves. Others (like myself) like to absorb the atmosphere and use that to bring out their best.

    In the case of Wimbledon, a large part of the aura of the tournament is the tradition. If the organisers are concerned that listening to music on the course is ‘disrespectful’ then they need to write the rules accordingly. If there is no rule then the athletes are forced to do what helps them the most and if that is to listen to music then so be it.

    Personally my reaction to the comment is ‘To whom is it being disrespectful to?’. Other players? The crowd? The Queen? Surely not allowing athletes to compete at their best is also disrespectful?

    #15339

    Lisa Rubin
    Participant

    I think it depends on the changing times as well as etiquette for the sport. I think music is a big part of my life and enabling concentration, so if it helps athletes right before a match, why not? However, it could be seen as inappropriate (e.g., wearing a short skirt on a golf course). I suppose it depends on the sport’s culture and the event’s culture so if only one person wanted to make it into an issue, than it is just her issue and not the athletes’ issue who wore headphones.

    #15366

    Edwin Leong Mun Kit
    Participant

    I would say so long it is not against any laws (game’s rules/laws or civil laws) and that the music is not disturbing or distracting anybody, it is ok.

    Though the sight of someone wearing headphones into the traditional Wimbledon may look disrespectful to some cannot be used as the reason to label it as a disrespect.

    Things change with time – music is recognised or at least accepted by many athletes as part of mental preparedness for sports and that technology has made it easy for all to own and use such devices.

    #15410

    Marc_Pedersen
    Participant

    I would agree with Navratilova’s comment that it is disrespectful to wear headphones or listen to music when entering the most prestigeful and traditional tennis tournament as Wimbledon. I think people wouldn’t look happy if a golf player had big headphones on just before going to the green and taking the opening swing at the Masters…

    And it actually wonders me that Wimbledon would allow it since they are very strict with the clothes the players wear (white only!).

    #15467

    Ong Chuan Leong
    Participant

    While Martina has the right to express her views, I don’t think players wearing headphones before a tennis match are necessarily being ‘disrespectful’ to the crowd. With the amount of rules and stress already present in high performance tennis tournaments, I think there’s no harm in letting players be in their ‘little own world’ for a moment.

    #15474

    wellytjia
    Participant

    I totally agree with Adam Szuster’s reply #15328.

    As has been covered music is a personal thing. Some like it to rev themselves up, others use it to calm their nerves. Others like to absorb the atmosphere and use that to bring out their best.

    In the case of Wimbledon, a large part of the aura of the tournament is the tradition. If the organisers are concerned that listening to music on the course is ‘disrespectful’ then they need to write the rules accordingly. If there is no rule then the athletes are allowed to do what helps them the most and if that is to listen to music then so be it.

    Personally my reaction to the comment is ‘To whom is it being disrespectful to?’. Other players? The crowd? The Queen? – May be? As for me, entering the arena and bowing to the queen 1st is an act of respect.

    #15592

    iskolaratleta58
    Participant

    It’s okay to bring music before the game. It can lessen anxiety and pressure and it can help the brain get into the game. Music can bring people into another level of concentration which may help them achieve their goals during competitions.

    #15599

    Vincent Yeo
    Participant

    As Wimbledon has a rich tradition, it would be best for players to show respect to the royalty and the crowd by taking off their headphone when entering the court. They can always put it on when seated on their seats and preparing for the match.

    #15648

    chuichisum
    Participant

    Music playlists should help an athlete build towards an optimal pre-competition mindset so that by the time the music finishes the athlete feels ready to compete.
    Though the sight of someone wearing headphones into the traditional Wimbledon may look disrespectful to some cannot be used as the reason to label it as a disrespect.

    #15688

    olivewani
    Participant

    Well that’s a good topic to talk about. Honestly it is up to individual on how they sees it. For me, it is not disrespectful to wear headphones in the court but it does not shows good athlete etiquette though. I mean if it helps the athletes in their performance then I guess it is not respectful after all.

    #15700

    KAO CHIH-CHIEN
    Participant

    I do not think there is wrong, everyone prepare different game mode, the player is seeking the best performance and make preparations, and therefore there is no reason to criticize.

    #15706

    Chen HAO
    Participant

    Music can help an athlete build the optimal state.Especially of pre-competition mindset .
    To be frank, it is up to individual on how they sees it. For me, it is not disrespectful to wear headphones in the court but it does not shows good athlete though. I mean if it helps the athletes in their performance then I guess it is not respectful .

    #15732

    Afrooz Mousavi
    Participant

    I think using energetic music for increasing speed and duration of hard training, is very useful. thank for the leopoldoferre’ good comment.

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